Must-read (and Share) Report on US K-12 CS Education

They say you can have data without information, but not the other way around.  So for those of you seeking data on why CS in K-12 matters there is good news today.  There is a new report out from Google and Gallup, which I particularly encourage all of our members in the US to read and share.  Whether you are in K-12, higher education, government, or the corporate environment the data and information contained in this report is important.  As we head into another school year, it would be great if every school board member, superintendent, principal, parent, and legislative representative read the report as well.

The report is entitled, Searching for Computer Science: Access and Barriers in K-12 Education, and is available as a downloadable PDF here.

In short, the study illustrates that CS education matters, and that there is strong demand for CS education in K-12.  Two key barriers identified in the study are that administrators do not perceive that demand, and there is a shortage of teachers to teach CS.  The report also has some illuminating data around issues of equity and access.  As a whole, the report touches on critical topics we are working on in CSTA now and have even bigger plans for going forward.

Among some of the interesting findings:

  • 91% of parents surveyed want their child to learn Computer Science (CS), but <8% of administrators believe demand is high.
  • Half of principals and superintendents surveyed cite the lack of trained teachers as a barrier – greater than the need for technology. Less than half of administrators perceive school board support for CS.
  • 3 out of 4 principals surveyed say their school offers NO CS programming/coding classes.
  • More than 90% of students and parents surveyed believe people who do computer science have the opportunity to work on fun and exciting projects, and that people who do CS make things that help improve people’s lives.

Given that yesterday marked the “two-month mark” for me as the new executive director for the Computer Science Teacher’s Association, this news only reinforces for me that the mission of CSTA — to empower, support, and advocate for K-12 computer science teachers — is a mission that matters.

We can do more.  We must do more. CS matters, and we need more support to give all students better access to quality CS education, and ensure that CS teachers across the educational spectrum have access to the PD and resources they need to provide that quality CS education.  A great first step is making sure that the findings of this study are communicated and shared widely.

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